FIFA Football 2002 (PS)

FIFA Football 2002 (PS)

FIFA Football 2002 (PS)
List Price: £29.99



FIFA Football 2002 (PS)
List Price: £29.99
Your Price: £0.96- FIFA Football 2002 (PS)

The latest version of the PSone’s most popular football game is sure to have many gamers eager in anticipation. Unfortunately, with FIFA Football 2002, they’re going to be severely disappointed. It’s instantly clear when you get into the game proper that the resources notoriously ploughed into the FIFA series are sadly lacking here, with alternative formats benefiting from EA Sports’ usual attention to detail. That leaves first-generation PlayStation owners with a tatty game that suffers from jerky scrolling, poor graphics and disappointing gameplay.

The infamous new passing method, making its debut in the 2002 edition, suffers from the lack of flow in the game. It’s that too that makes sliding tackles very tricky to judge, and, ultimately, makes FIFA Football 2002 a chore to play. It’s a shame, as the front end is the usual sleek affair, and the intro cut scenes are a great deal more professional. You can’t help feeling that there is a playable game buried in there somewhere, and there are certainly plenty of league and cup options to keep you busy. Yet when games such as ISS Pro Evolution 2 manage to squeeze so much out of the original PlayStation technology, it’s hard to find a compelling reason to fork out for this tepid, lazy update that’s a step backwards for the FIFA series. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £0.96 – FIFA Football 2002 (PS)

Medal of Honor: Allied Assault Expansion Pack

Medal of Honor: Allied Assault Expansion Pack

Medal of Honor: Allied Assault Expansion Pack
List Price: £19.99



Medal of Honor: Allied Assault Expansion Pack
List Price: £19.99
Your Price: £4.99- Medal of Honor: Allied Assault Expansion Pack

A very welcome expansion pack to an already classic game, Medal of Honor Allied Assault: Spearhead mixes in additional single and multiplayer challenges. The first person action kicks off with D-Day, and the same kind of measured, yet frantic, gameplay that earned the game an add-on in the first place, is present and correct.

Kicking off with the playing parachuting through a hail of bullets, Spearhead’s missions bother little with plot, instead opting for more of the same. Thus, there’s first-person action, tank driving and simple issues, such as survival, to consider once more.

In the enhancements column, you certainly feel more part of a squad this time around, with colleagues ready to stand alongside you in battle. Leaning is incorporated into the single player game for the first time, which helps combat the previously overbalanced snipers. Little tweaks here and there tighten things up too, and there’s a few more weapons thrown in too. Pretty much what you’d expect from an add-on pack.

On the multiplayer side, a dozen new maps are included, and this, as last time, range from tight, tense levels to more open battles. They seem slightly larger than before too, and as with the single player levels, they’re enjoyable, challenging, and won’t disappoint. What will is the length of the single-player mission, which is notably shorter than previously. What’s there is very good; there’s simply not enough of it.

Nonetheless, with the various tweaks taken into account, Spearhead undoubtedly improves and prolongs the original, and boasts the same high production values. It’s a pack that no Allied Assault fan can really be without. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £4.99 – Medal of Honor: Allied Assault Expansion Pack

Virtual Skipper 3 (PC)

Virtual Skipper 3 (PC)

Virtual Skipper 3 (PC)
List Price: £34.99


  • Tropical Map Editor
  • Solo Or Multiplayer Mode
  • Advanced 3D Engine
  • Accurate Racing Rules
  • Meticulous Attention To Detail

Virtual Skipper 3 (PC)
List Price: £34.99
Your Price: £3.00- Virtual Skipper 3 (PC)

Virtual Skipper 3 PC
Virtual Fleet Racing

With an emphasis strongly on simulation, Virtual Skipper 3 has plenty of merits to endear it to PC gamers. Not only is it one of the few titles to attempt recreating the feeling of sailing a yacht, it also has plenty up its sleeves to make it a good long term investment.

Working through a well thought through interface, the initial emphasis is on getting you up and sailing. That’s not too tricky, and the learning curve is gentle enough to keep you interested despite the game’s challenges.

Where the game really scores though is when you bring in the competitive element. It plunges you into races across familiar and strongly realised stretches of water, drawing upon numerous skills. You’ll need to plan your best route across the waters. You’ll need to take account of wind speeds and water currents. And then you’ll need to fight off a quality field of competitors. In short, there’s a lot to take note of, and if you get into it, it’ll eat time away with genuine ease.

Because of that, Virtual Skipper 3 won’t endear itself to all. It’s hardly a pick-up-and-play kind of game, nor is it one that will appeal to those who require their gaming to be more arcade flavoured. Still, in this case it’s all the better for it. For this is a deliberately serious, very enjoyable and–when on top form–utterly engrossing title. Graphically excellent, it’s also a game that doesn’t skimp on the multi-player options.

In short, not only is it a strong sailing simulation, it’s a quality title in its own right, and a very sound purchase too. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £3.00 – Virtual Skipper 3 (PC)

Rise Of Nations (PC CD)

Rise Of Nations (PC CD)

Rise Of Nations (PC CD)
List Price: £19.99



Rise Of Nations (PC CD)
List Price: £19.99
Your Price: £6.37- Rise Of Nations (PC CD)

PC gamers, as a breed, aren’t short of strategy games to play. But the canny mix of real time and turn-based gameplay that underpins Rise of Nations proves to be initially intriguing and deceptively addictive.

The game’s focus is spread over some 6,000 years, with numerous scenarios pitching you initially into the midst of ancient history and ultimately bringing events right up to date. In each scenario, several skills are at times aggressively tested; there’s the need for diplomacy, the odd bit of combat, resource management and trading. In short, pretty much the staple diet of most strategy games.

Where Rise of Nations takes a different path though is in its approach. The single player mode brings into play a strategic map–think of the board game Risk and you’re about there–and charges you with the task of capturing fresh territories whilst successfully defending your own. It’s a weighty addition to an already long-lasting game, and marries up nicely to the real time strategy element that subsequently kicks in.

Furthermore, the game’s surprisingly easy to get into, and as you progress your people from a basic beginning through to a more advanced society, it’s hard not to get immersed in it all. While ironing out the need for petty decision making that’s brought several other titles in the genre to their knees, Rise of Nations still demands much taxing of the grey matter, and to its credit, there’s rarely just one way to approach a problem. And that’s before the highly entertaining battles kick in.

From time to time, you could argue that the gameplay gets slightly repetitive and the mixing in of two different styles of strategy style isn’t going to appeal to all. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £6.37 – Rise Of Nations (PC CD)

Aggressive Inline (PS2)

Aggressive Inline (PS2)

Aggressive Inline (PS2)
List Price: £39.99



Aggressive Inline (PS2)
List Price: £39.99
Your Price: £24.94- Aggressive Inline (PS2)

Consoles now have little shortage of entries in the extreme sports genre, making it all the more surprising that Aggressive Inline feels that bit different from the rest in the field, and also emerges as one of the most pleasant gaming surprises of the year.

The sport at the heart of it is inline skating, which quickly provides an ample excuse for some fast skating and plenty of tricks. Backed by a friendly and genuinely helpful tutorial, the key options are all present and correct–you can play in career mode, have a free skate, take on timed runs and design your own parks too.

These modes are backed by an admittedly limited but nonetheless varied selection of bountiful levels, each of which holds plenty to keep your attention. Furthermore, each delivers a subtlety different challenge and exerts differing demands on the player. That said, there’s still plenty of freedom for you to master the numerous tricks and combos you need to rack up a big score.

Graphically, the game is very strong, and the gameplay is genuinely accessible, offering generous rewards whether you want a quick go or an extended session. Packed with surprises, Aggressive Inline is highly detailed, yet blissfully player-centred. It’s no huge evolution in the genre, yet it’s still a notable step forward and, bottom line, an excellent and highly enjoyable game. Are you watching, Tony Hawk? —Simon Brew

Your Price: £24.94 – Aggressive Inline (PS2)

Dancing Stage Fever (PS2)

Dancing Stage Fever (PS2)

Dancing Stage Fever (PS2)
List Price: £29.99



Dancing Stage Fever (PS2)
List Price: £29.99
Your Price: £17.00- Dancing Stage Fever (PS2)

The latest addition to the popular series of dancing games, Dancing Stage Fever not only offers another welcome opportunity to get your dance mat hooked up to your PlayStation, but also throws in some new goodies to keep your feet moving that bit longer.

The crux of the game is the same as always. In time with the directions on screen, you need to make sure your foot hits the appropriate symbol at the right time. The more accurate you are, the better you will do. You can still play the game with a standard control pad, incidentally, but it’s a fruitless exercise, especially when you consider just how cheap a dance mat is.

New this time round (although when you’re in the midst of a dance it’s harder to appreciate it) is the inclusion of officially licensed music videos (PS2 version only). It’s a nice addition, but of more interest is the roster of new songs, including tracks from the Spice Girls, Madness and numerous 80s artists. There are plenty of songs to dance to, which is what it’s all about.

Anyone who has enjoyed a Dancing Stage game to date is going to find few faults here. It hardly changes the formula of the genre, but then it doesn’t need to. It provides a fresh dose of high-entertainment dancing fun, even if your feet will hurt by the time you’ve finished. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £17.00 – Dancing Stage Fever (PS2)

Links 2003

Links 2003

Links 2003
List Price: £34.99



Links 2003
List Price: £34.99
Your Price: – Links 2003

The latest version of the world’s bestselling PC golf game franchise, Links 2003 is a polished, comprehensive and challenging simulation that holds appeal for all levels of player.

Living up to its claims of photo realistic graphics, it’s a game brimming with options, yet also equipped with a useful if a little drawn out tutorial section. Still, the learning curve is further aided by special aids, which can be turned off as the player gets better, to help with judging the likes of aim and power.

Included are six brand new courses to the Links franchise, along with a comprehensive and genuinely useable course designer. There’s a choice on how you play your strokes too. While the traditional gauge that permeates most golf games is included, a real time swing–whereby the mouse movement controls the club hitting the ball–is a more interesting way to play.

The devil in Links 2003 though is well and truly in the detail. From the nuances of creating your own golfer through to the visualisation of the courses, it’s clear that little expense has been spared. That the game also comes with a challenging and long lasting single-player mode in addition to time-guzzling online multiplayer options is but a further compelling reason to buy the game. For if you’re a golf game fan, nothing on any format does this better. And heck, even if you’re not and you like your sports simulations, it really is worth finding out what all the fuss is about. —Simon Brew

Your Price: – Links 2003

Wallace and Gromit – Project Zoo (GameCube)

Wallace and Gromit – Project Zoo (GameCube)

Wallace and Gromit - Project Zoo (GameCube)
List Price: £29.99



Wallace and Gromit - Project Zoo (GameCube)
List Price: £29.99
Your Price: £39.99- Wallace and Gromit - Project Zoo (GameCube)

To this point, the famous Plasticine duo Wallace & Gromit haven’t featured in a game worthy of their name. Project Zoo, fortunately, is a radical improvement on what’s gone before. And while it’s not without its flaws, it does deliver rousing fun to its younger target audience.

The simple plots finds the evil Feathers McGraw taking control of the local zoo–and more notably locking up all the infant animals. They need saving and that’s where our heroic duo come in. To rescue them, there’s an entertaining platform game in the way, with some little diversions and mini-arcade games to keep things ticking along.

It’s well put together too: the graphics are strong and the interjections of the two lead characters, especially in the numerous cut scenes, will frequently raise a chuckle. The levels pit you against many of McGraw’s gang and, as you’d expect, there are numerous items to collect and lots to explore. A nice added feature is that Wallace can turn some of the objects into some batty invention to help you on your way.

It’s a very easy game to get into and while the action won’t get your pulse pounding, Project Zoo sets it stall out early as a provider of some good, leisurely, family-friendly entertainment. That it captures the flavour of Wallace & Gromit so well is a very welcome bonus. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £39.99 – Wallace and Gromit - Project Zoo (GameCube)

Battlefield 1942

Battlefield 1942

Battlefield 1942
List Price: £34.99



Battlefield 1942
List Price: £34.99
Your Price: £49.99- Battlefield 1942

Aimed squarely at the growing online-gaming market, Electronic Arts’ latest PC action-strategy title Battlefield 1942 is a tense, involving game that wisely doesn’t totally ignore the single player.

Set in the midst of the Second World War, the action plays out as a satisfying hybrid of the tactical, slow build-up of Ghost Recon, mixed in with the more action-based Medal of Honor: Allied Assault. Kicking off with an overall map of the area, each game requires some strategic planning before you get down to business, and with 35 vehicles on offer, as well as five classes of character to step into the shoes of, there’s much to consider. To the developers’ credit, it’s quite an easy game to get to grips with, and it positively reeks of polish. The stylised graphics and sound convey the action well, and do contribute to the nice, slow build-up of tension before the skirmishes kick off. Even though you only control one character at a time, you are left feeling part of a team fighting against a common enemy.

As a one player experience, the game’s not too bad, thanks to an unscripted approach to each level. It does leave you without a real long-term goal to aim at though. However, in multiplayer mode, Battlefield 1942 really comes into its own, as no matter how strong the artificial intelligence of the computer opponent–and here it isn’t bad at all–it’s scant compensation for a real, unpredictable human opponent.

At its maximum capacity, up to 64 humans can take part in any single game and, even with smaller numbers, the online nature of the game is completely compelling. It’s an easy recommendation for those who like to fight their battles over the net, and a reasonable, if limited single challenge too. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £49.99 – Battlefield 1942

Battlefield 1942

Battlefield 1942

Battlefield 1942
List Price: £34.99



Battlefield 1942
List Price: £34.99
Your Price: £49.99- Battlefield 1942

Aimed squarely at the growing online-gaming market, Electronic Arts’ latest PC action-strategy title Battlefield 1942 is a tense, involving game that wisely doesn’t totally ignore the single player.

Set in the midst of the Second World War, the action plays out as a satisfying hybrid of the tactical, slow build-up of Ghost Recon, mixed in with the more action-based Medal of Honor: Allied Assault. Kicking off with an overall map of the area, each game requires some strategic planning before you get down to business, and with 35 vehicles on offer, as well as five classes of character to step into the shoes of, there’s much to consider. To the developers’ credit, it’s quite an easy game to get to grips with, and it positively reeks of polish. The stylised graphics and sound convey the action well, and do contribute to the nice, slow build-up of tension before the skirmishes kick off. Even though you only control one character at a time, you are left feeling part of a team fighting against a common enemy.

As a one player experience, the game’s not too bad, thanks to an unscripted approach to each level. It does leave you without a real long-term goal to aim at though. However, in multiplayer mode, Battlefield 1942 really comes into its own, as no matter how strong the artificial intelligence of the computer opponent–and here it isn’t bad at all–it’s scant compensation for a real, unpredictable human opponent.

At its maximum capacity, up to 64 humans can take part in any single game and, even with smaller numbers, the online nature of the game is completely compelling. It’s an easy recommendation for those who like to fight their battles over the net, and a reasonable, if limited single challenge too. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £49.99 – Battlefield 1942

Pop Idol (PS2)

Pop Idol (PS2)

Pop Idol (PS2)
List Price: £29.99



Pop Idol (PS2)
List Price: £29.99
Your Price: £3.20- Pop Idol (PS2)

Based on the television phenomenon of the same name, Pop Idol marries many of the key features of the show. And while there are times when you can’t help feeling that this isn’t the most substantial game you’ve ever played, there is some fun to be had.

The idea is simple. You create a singer and take them through the heats and qualifying rounds to the final. If all goes to plan, you get crowned the Pop Idol. If it doesn’t, you get to suffer the acid tongues of the three judges, including the infamous Simon Cowell.

Clearly, a video game is going to have troubling assessing your vocal talents and that is a downfall. Instead, Pop Idol substitutes a simple rhythm-style game, not a million miles from classics such as Parappa the Rappa. Basically, symbols correlating to your control pad head towards the middle of the screen and you need to have the relevant button pressed at exactly the right moment. The more you get it right, the better you do. You’re also assessed on your outfit, which you choose along with your song before every round.

It’s ultimately quite a simple, straightforward title and one that could have been better, could have been worse. It’s going to find favour more easily with the casual, less demanding gamer, though, and dedicated fans of the show. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £3.20 – Pop Idol (PS2)

LMA Manager 2001

LMA Manager 2001

LMA Manager 2001
List Price: £29.99


  • LMA Manager 2001

LMA Manager 2001
List Price: £29.99
Your Price: £34.99- LMA Manager 2001

LMA Manager 2001 Playstation 1.

Managing a football team has rarely worked well on a console. Yet with Codemasters’ LMA Manager 2001, PlayStation owners not only have an addictive and involving strategy game, but have also had it proved to them beyond all reasonable doubt that tough sporting strategy games can work away from a PC.

The game puts you in charge of the team of your choice (with each side having different expectation levels set by their respective boards), leaving you to wheel and deal, use your tactical skills and hope for a little luck as you guide your team from season to season. You can switch jobs, of course (sometimes not by choice), and there are plenty of trophies up for grabs, but make no mistake–LMA Manager 2001 isn’t an easy game to win by any means.

It is fun to play though, helped enormously by an interactive match day screen which allows you to watch the game play out in front of you. This leaves you free to tinker with tactics and substitutions, and offers clear guidance as to what you’re doing right and wrong. You can speed it up or simply get your results, but this added interactivity is clearly one of the key assets of the game.

LMA Manager 2001 succeeds simply because it sucks you in. Sure, it takes time to play, and at times you’ll tear your hair out. But when you finally add the FA Cup to your trophy cabinet, you’ll find it was all worth it. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £34.99 – LMA Manager 2001

World Rally Championship II Extreme Platinum

World Rally Championship II Extreme Platinum

World Rally Championship II Extreme Platinum
List Price: £19.99



World Rally Championship II Extreme Platinum
List Price: £19.99
Your Price: £8.99- World Rally Championship II Extreme Platinum

Utilising their exclusive licence to the FIA World Rally Championship, and making big improvements to the game too, Sony have thrown a sizeable gauntlet down to their rivals with World Rally Championship II Extreme. From the off, it’s clear much work has been done. The graphics, for instance, are excellent, from the detailed cars to the various rugged terrains you race over. And as with most rallying games, it’s a meaty challenge, particularly in the early stages as you get used to things, and towards the end, as you try to win everything. The option exists to dive in for a quick race, but the real dividends are reaped when you take on the WRC mode.

Said mode pits you into a full season, with multi-day and multi-stage races that take place right across the world over varying terrain. As such, the game calls not just for good driving skills–although they’re understandably vital–but also a tactical approach as you adjust facets such as your gears, brakes and tyres to suit the forthcoming challenge.

And when it gets down to the action, World Rally Championship II Extreme delivers. It’s presents an enthralling, if testing, series of races, which can also be run in multiplayer mode. Perhaps it’s still a little way behind its main rival, the Colin McRae Rally series, but it’s a genuinely enjoyable challenge for the more experienced rally game fan. It’s less forgiving than Mr McRae for those new to the genre, but then this is a serious rally game for serious rally game fans, and they would argue it’s all the better for it. It requires dedication, practice and persistence from those who beat it, but they’ll certainly have got strong value for money by the time they get to the end. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £8.99 – World Rally Championship II Extreme Platinum

Ferrari 355

Ferrari 355

Ferrari 355
List Price: £39.99



Ferrari 355
List Price: £39.99
Your Price: £7.94- Ferrari 355

Ferrari F355 has been a long time coming to the PS2 and it’s showing its age a little, but it still offers quality entertainment and remains an immense challenge for the dedicated driving game fan.

Despite the presence of an arcade mode and various driving aids to help break the player into the game, this isn’t the kind of racing game that beginners will easily find enjoyable. Much practice and a patient, tactical approach win you races here–boy racers are strictly not welcome. Those more familiar with the genre will find plenty to get their teeth into: there are testing courses, good handling, competition with unexpectedly good computer AI cars and some really engrossing races. And you get to drive a Ferrari, even if it is only a virtual one. One of the new additions for the PS2 version, the Great Driver Challenge Mode, is a thoughtful feature. It continually evaluates your driving skill as well as assessing you via a traditional stopwatch.

Still, no matter how it’s dressed up, Ferrari F355 is still a belated port of an excellent Dreamcast title. Despite commendable cosmetic enhancements and some nice extra options, it’s the same old game at root, but this time it sits with the likes of Gran Turismo 3. Fortunately it has good quality, old-fashioned gameplay at its core, and it’s not afraid to really test the armchair racer. And while it’s not likely to be the first-choice driving game on many people’s lists, it’s certainly one that the accomplished fan of the genre will enjoy. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £7.94 – Ferrari 355

World Rally Championship II Extreme

World Rally Championship II Extreme

World Rally Championship II Extreme
List Price: £34.99



World Rally Championship II Extreme
List Price: £34.99
Your Price: £7.46- World Rally Championship II Extreme

Utilising their exclusive licence to the FIA World Rally Championship, and making big improvements to the game too, Sony have thrown a sizeable gauntlet down to their rivals with World Rally Championship II Extreme. From the off, it’s clear much work has been done. The graphics, for instance, are excellent, from the detailed cars to the various rugged terrains you race over. And as with most rallying games, it’s a meaty challenge, particularly in the early stages as you get used to things, and towards the end, as you try to win everything. The option exists to dive in for a quick race, but the real dividends are reaped when you take on the WRC mode.

Said mode pits you into a full season, with multi-day and multi-stage races that take place right across the world over varying terrain. As such, the game calls not just for good driving skills–although they’re understandably vital–but also a tactical approach as you adjust facets such as your gears, brakes and tyres to suit the forthcoming challenge.

And when it gets down to the action, World Rally Championship II Extreme delivers. It’s presents an enthralling, if testing, series of races, which can also be run in multiplayer mode. Perhaps it’s still a little way behind its main rival, the Colin McRae Rally series, but it’s a genuinely enjoyable challenge for the more experienced rally game fan. It’s less forgiving than Mr McRae for those new to the genre, but then this is a serious rally game for serious rally game fans, and they would argue it’s all the better for it. It requires dedication, practice and persistence from those who beat it, but they’ll certainly have got strong value for money by the time they get to the end. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £7.46 – World Rally Championship II Extreme

Burnout 2 : Point of Impact (Platinum)

Burnout 2 : Point of Impact (Platinum)

Burnout 2 : Point of Impact (Platinum)
List Price: £19.99



Burnout 2 : Point of Impact (Platinum)
List Price: £19.99
Your Price: £19.99- Burnout 2 : Point of Impact (Platinum)

Burnout 2, like its acclaimed predecessor, puts fun right at the top of the agenda, dispenses with niggling irritants like realism and delivers top-class gaming entertainment.

So what’s new? There are additional locations, including a twisty road round the Rocky Mountains and an inspired airport-based level. There is also a greater choice of vehicles. Naturally enough you have to balance your need for speed against the need for good handling and take into account the weather and the kind of level you’re racing across.

Yet the core of Burnout 2 is still arcade-style racing and there’s little else that does it better. It’s incredibly accessible and an absolute blast to play. It doesn’t matter whether you’re competing in the enhanced single-player modes or hooking up with friends–it’s completely irresistible. Visually, the game looks great and moves very, very quickly. The action is interspersed with elaborate crashes, and when you do hit something you shouldn’t, you’re rewarded with an action replay for your trouble.

There are genuinely very few negatives here. Those who prefer their driving games flavoured with a bit more realism are going to be happier with a Gran Turismo game. Also, despite some good improvements and additions, there aren’t enormous differences between this and the original Burnout. However, Burnout 2 is an exemplary piece of gaming entertainment, and a welcome antidote to the growing band of games that just take themselves far too seriously. Treat yourself. You’ll be glad you did. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £19.99 – Burnout 2 : Point of Impact (Platinum)

Hitman: Contracts (PC)

Hitman: Contracts (PC)

Hitman: Contracts (PC)
List Price: £29.99



Hitman: Contracts (PC)
List Price: £29.99
Your Price: £2.49- Hitman: Contracts (PC)

With its winning mix of action, strategy and stealth, Hitman Contracts marks a successful third entry in the franchise, and has some neat new tricks up its sleeve. That said, the core of the game is still fundamentally the same as before. You take the role of a genetically modified hitman who from the off finds himself in deep trouble, holed up in a tight spot surrounded by people who want him dead. The reasons why become clear as you play your way through a series of flashbacks, some of which draw heavily from the previous games in the series. Fortunately, the similarities also stretch to the gameplay, which is by turns taut, tense and violent. The game gives you plenty of freedom in choosing how to tackle the various missions you’re presented with, and particularly in the early stages it’s tremendously good fun working out the best way to achieve an objective.

There are a couple of drawbacks: the game is a little shorter than might be expected, and it is more of an evolution from previous adventures than a independent sequel. But these are minor niggles, especially when you consider that this is the best game to date in the Hitman franchise. It’s going to be interesting to see how creators Io Interactive develop the series, but for now they’ve given us a healthy dose of what’s gone before, and made it a little better. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £2.49 – Hitman: Contracts (PC)

Medal of Honor: Rising Sun (GameCube)

Medal of Honor: Rising Sun (GameCube)

Medal of Honor: Rising Sun (GameCube)
List Price: £39.99



Medal of Honor: Rising Sun (GameCube)
List Price: £39.99
Your Price: £8.97- Medal of Honor: Rising Sun (GameCube)

Following on from a succession of hugely popular campaigns across numerous formats, Medal of Honor: Rising Sun brings the franchise back to consoles with another engrossing first-person action game. The action is taken to the Pacific Theatre for the first time, plunging the player into the shoes of Marine Corporal Joseph Griffin. Over the course of the game, he has a lot to get through too. There’s Pearl Harbor to survive. His brother to rescue. And the small matter of a number of Japanese soldiers who stand in the way…

In truth, the formula hasn’t moved on much for the franchise, but then it does work spectacularly well. The game’s various missions are varied, and they demand elements of stealth, action and a bit of sabotage along the way. And they’re not afraid to pull the proverbial rug from underneath to keep you on your toes. As ever, the multimedia elements border on spectacular. The musical scores of Medal of Honor games are rarely given the credit they deserve, but their contribution really can’t be understated. The cinematic visuals, however, do tend to hog the headlines, and it’s easy to see why. As you fight to complete a mission with explosions going off all around you there’s little time to notice them.

A couple of mild criticisms, then. There isn’t much scope to deviate from the set path through the game, which is very tightly scripted. Not a bad thing, but not something that will appeal to everyone. Plus it would be nice to see a few more risks taken with the Medal of Honor formula. These mild grumbles aside, Medal of Honor: Rising Sun is simply a very good video game. It’s tense, gripping and desperately addictive. And when you ultimately see the end game sequence, you really will be thirsting for more. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £8.97 – Medal of Honor: Rising Sun (GameCube)

Burnout Platinum  (PS2)

Burnout Platinum  (PS2)

Burnout Platinum  (PS2)
List Price: £19.99



Burnout Platinum  (PS2)
List Price: £19.99
Your Price: £9.99- Burnout Platinum  (PS2)

Like your racing games fast, furious, and full of spectacular smashes? You’re in luck. With Burnout, Acclaim remove all pretence of going for a serious simulation and instead serve up a delicious dish of pure arcade fun on the PlayStation 2. There are two key selling points to the game–the speed the action runs at, and the spectacular crashes. To facilitate these, the set-up couldn’t be more straightforward, with the aim simply being to be first past the post. You can increase your chances of this by driving more dangerously, although that comes with obvious pitfalls in the shape of those aforementioned smashes. Suffice it to say, though, to get through the game you’re going to have to take your chances.

Contrary to the serious approach of Gran Turismo 3, this is foot-to-the-pedal stuff, and tremendously good fun to play. And when you do put your proverbial foot down, get ready to move, for this is a blisteringly fast title that deceptively requires more concentration than it would first appear. The downside is that this won’t appeal to those who like their racing games nice and serious, nor to those looking for anything particularly innovative. For Burnout has few qualms about marrying the multimedia power of the PlayStation 2 to a game engine that forsakes bells and whistles for speed, destruction and sheer good fun. Fortunately, in this case, it’s all the better for it, making it yet another PS2 four wheel treat. —Simon Brew

Your Price: £9.99 – Burnout Platinum  (PS2)

Dancing Stage Party Edition (PS1)

Dancing Stage Party Edition (PS1)

Dancing Stage Party Edition (PS1)
List Price: £19.99



Dancing Stage Party Edition (PS1)
List Price: £19.99
Your Price: – Dancing Stage Party Edition (PS1)

Featuring over 50 songs this time around, including contributions from high-profile acts such as Kylie Minogue, Chaka Khan and S Club, Dancing Stage Party Edition is a welcome and expansive addition to the popular dance game franchise. First things first, though: don’t even think of trying to play it without a dance mat peripheral–you can tackle the game using the standard PlayStation or PS2 controller, but there’s little point.

The game works by throwing up symbols on screen, which indicate where you need to move your feet (or your fingers if you’re determined not to get a mat). Effectively it’s as simple as that. Consistently have your feet where they’re supposed to be, when they’re supposed to be there, and your score will be high. Keep messing it up, and you boogie will have a habit of ending prematurely.

The complications are injected when the tempo is upped, and the game demands that you simply move quicker to keep up. But even when the game’s sheer novelty factor is exhausted, there’s plenty of reason to keep going thanks to the gradually increasing challenge that it presents. And frankly, Dancing Stage Party Mix is as compulsively entertaining as its predecessors. It particularly hits top gear when two players can dance head to head–though this requires two dance mats. Even the fitness-tailored single player workout mode works well.

The game’s only real limit comes when you’ve worked your way through all the songs, and even then it’s going to take some time to do that. Aside from that, this is polished, very enjoyable fun that virtually all gamers can warm to. —Simon Brew

Your Price: – Dancing Stage Party Edition (PS1)